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20121205
20121213
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Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
, people's experiences in working in international environments to help promote humanitarian missions. fleet week got involved with a humanitarian mission back in october in the earthquake in van, turkey. there's a heavy kurdish in san francisco and the ... better recover from their event and how to better prepare in the future from the katz traufk event that had taken place would not occur. we got a phone call at the fleet week association to ask if we could help bring together some resources and leet a fact-finding mission and we did that. one of our panelists is up here, second from your left, rob dudgeon, he's with the department of emergency management and he's the director of emergency services. rob's organization has been instrumental in creating the program that we have from back in 2010 all the way through to today and i know in the future we're already talking about putting together a hot wash of everything we've learned through 2012's fleet week. so rob is going to talk about the van, turkey mission. from turkey we have rear admiral guereva he has more than 14 years se
what they are doing here and implications in the overall security environment on the korean peninsula, as well as destination. >> anything new? we been hearing some rumblings for some time that there might be some activity on that front. anything new that you can provide in terms of insights into launches or things like that? >> well, i think you're tracking a pretty well. i think from the media today there are indications declared indications of their intention to do what they would call a peaceful satellite launch. and we believe it is in contradictory to the u.n. security council resolutions, that because of the nature of the type of missile they will be firing and the implications it has for ballistic missile type of activity somewhere down the road, and the destabilizing impact that will have on security incitement throughout the throughout the region, not just on the peninsula. >> can you follow up on some of -- was short assessment? they say they have solve whatever problems they had with her april failed launch. what's your assessment? how could they have solve the problem? wh
in a statewide environment. i think the biggest thing for me, there's several scenarios that are challenging us, one of which and one of our fears, and it's been in the newspaper so it's not a secret, but one of the things that scares me as well is the united states is not really experienced what i would call a global disaster yet. we have had disasters, i was in katrina on an urban search and rescue team, i've been in pretty much all major engagements as far as wild land fires in california, but if you look at a global disaster perspective where you have a hundred thousand victims like a tsunami or a large scale event, we have yet to experience that in this nation. i think the agreements we have here today and the relationships we develop today are going to be key to mitigate that. the other scenario that we are concerned with is a coordinated aerial incendiary attack by al qaeda. one of the things we've seen already in the european union is suspect of al qaeda starting fires in the eu if that happened in california in the right weather conditions, it would be disasterous and everybody in
in these type of environments and we were able to really take those and learn more about each other for future responses. we were able to take and provide a taylored response package to better serve the customer. again, we don't want to go in with a full package that the state or civil environments aren't really asking for, we want to be sure it's taylored appropriately and it's responsive and timely. we also had the humanitarian assistance coordination center. that's the place we were able to take the non-governmental agencies and the hoetion nation international agencies and have them interacting and coordinating with the military folks so that we were able to provide an understanding of how we all work together. so if you want additional information, if you want to talk to captain napalitano, he is the commanding officer for the expeditionary training group, and he is the -- in charge of the people that train and certify that crisis response adaptive force package. his folks also put together the different events for this, for the exercise. the apan provides us an opportunity to be able
sexually assault another. our folks deserve a safe environment. what we're doing about it is one, we need to educate folks and understand what it is and how it degrades readiness, this sexual assault thing. some folks just don't understand it. we've completed that training with our seniors, if you will, with our leaders. sailors are next and that is in progress. i think it's a pretty good training process. it's the same process, if you will, the same means we use for the don't ask, don't tell training which we got high grades for from the sailors themselves. they need to understand the culture and the means of it. next, we need to -- we are measuring them and discussing what happened. the commanding officer of that unit talks to the first flag in the chain of command where there has been a sexual assault and discusses what was the occasion, what was the environment. we track those, find out where they're occurring. then we find out why they're occurring. then we go after that. a very deliberate, if you will, straightforward manner to find out why are they happening. so i like to say i wan
of hearing about frankly. the overburdensome regulatory environment that we're in is depressing growth, particularly for small business. and i think that's a primary distinction here as we talk about business itself because all business is not created equal. and the president's jobs council who has some wonderful folks, some friends of mind on it, wholly inefficient in my view because there is no representation from small business on that jobs council. melissa: catherine, let me ask you, what i look what happened with the case in darden, it seems like what happened to a bunch of different companies, my take at the end of the day, for sure they're not going to hire anyone and that's what we need more than anything right now. >> you're exactly right. what we need are jobs, jobs, jobs. there is so much uncertainty out there right now with what will happen with taxes. we still don't know the full impacts of obamacare. hundreds of thousands of new regulations. we need to know what is going on to make good decisions and grow our businesses because of that. melissa: jamie, do you think to a c
'll be saving the environment on that. >> if you're tired of buying make your own. >> soda stream revolution, one-touch technology. so easy to use, put the -- check that out, put the bottle inside there, snaps in there, pick the fizz you want, press it in there, it has a monitor that lets you know how much fizz you're putting in. 60 flavors to choose from none of which have high fructose corn syrup or aspartame. >> before we go, who doesn't want to throw their iphone into water? >> put that in there. this is the first android smartphone. drop it in there. you can get without a contract, $70 from boost mobile and it's water proof, three feet in 30 minutes and it won't ruin. >> no more running for the tub of rice. there you go. thank you so much, fun ideas. really appreciate it. time right now, 7:29, 51 degrees on tv hill. stay with us. >> you're watching wbal-tv 11, live, local, late breaking. this is 11 news sunday morning. >> welcome back to 11 news sunday morning, thanks for waking up with us today. >> we're getting a check outside. is it clearing up? >> hardly, dense fog people have to wo
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environment we see in china. >> this may not be the final word. we could see legal challenges. but right to work advocates chalked up probably their most significant victory by adding michigan to their list. back to you guys. >>> thank you, doug. these developments out of michigan the big talker this morning as you saw the protests turning violent. >> evidences assaulted. the violence at the rally compared to that of the tea party rally. sean hannity and ann coulter are talking it. >> eerie time you look at wisconsin, you look at michigan, you look at the occupy movement, you look at the g-8, g 20 summits all these things it's the left and they are violent. >> it's in their nature. part of it is encouraged the double standard. you admit they are never held to account. where as republicans, i mean, they are constantly being watched and falsely accused of engaging in violence as you were saying. >> on europe list any time ann coulter speaks on a college campus. college campus with low sat scores the ivy league treated me like a dream. >> little more respectful. >> it's the ones where they
for the disabled. a cleaner environment. safer world. you want all that, right? well, the european space agency says it's got the answer, and it's in space. cnn's aiyish reports from london. >> like an audio gps for the blind and visually impaired, the faster it ticks, you are on the right track. >> if you turn to the right side,ist the wrong way. if you go to the left side, it's the wrong way. so you find in the middle where it's very loud. there you have to go. >> reporter: satellites are used by different industries, like aviation. used in bad weather for planes and helicopters. >> the new aviation paradigm is going to be satellite navigation to be sure that aircrafts are going to be better using the airspace and the use of landing, and that there's more safe landings available at airports that don't have a lot of traffic. >> this is the european space expo. a traveling exhibition dome showing off space applications and the flagship projects of the european space program. for antonio, vice president of the european commission, space is at the center of the e.u. strategy. >> it's crucial for
the environment in which people can explore literature especially. i think that there aren't enough programs like this around the country. i wish there were more. the literary community in albany is quite rich, and we're in kind of feedback loop with it. i don't think such an operation as the writer's institute could have been created in the first place without there being not only a strong group of writers, find sort of an arc from down toward columbia county where a lot of new york city writers have weekend homes all the way up to saratoga and beyond. we have places like yado, the writer's colony there and writers' groups in hudson, new york, east and west into western massachusetts and west to syracuse. that's the audience sort of circumference that we work with. so when you go back and you find a general population quite proud of albany's connections to henry james and herman melville or even brett hart -- a story writer -- or just, you know, a little bit further east over to wave to emily dickenson or a little bit further south to say hi to our old friend walt whitman or edith wharton. when
environment the senate moved forward in a positive way and i believe we did the right thing. senator robert byrd of west virginia was a critical member of the gang of 14. in addition to his many, many accomplishments over the years, everyone knew then and knows now that there isn't anyone more well versed in the history of the senate or who was more protective of it as an institution. and i'll never forget that after the agreement was finalized and we were all sitting in a room, senator byrd said that he was proud of the work accomplished and that we -- quote -- "saved the senate." hearing those words from the distinguished senator byrd was undoubtedly one of the proudest moments of my career. and besides senator byrd, i've had the opportunity to serve with so many dedicated public servants in this body. i'd like to thank all of them. i start name so, i'll leave some out. so i just want to thank all present and past members of the senate that i've worked with and thank them for the occasion that i've had to work with them so closely. i also share the sentiment that many of my colleagues hav
that as a preference, i could not have. but to hear people talk about them, going into an environment like that, i white say that i actually like it. -- i might say that i actually like it and that is still a huge part of the american television experience that gets sold short by talking about anytime, anywhere now. there is a certain amount of escapism and passivity in roaming around the television jungle, finding things that you did not know were there. >> michael powell on the future of television, tonight on c-span 2. >> "washington journal" continues. host: we are continuing our series, looking at different parts of the fiscal cliff talks. joining us now is robert levenson, a senior defense analyst at bloomberg government. let's begin with what secret -- with what sequestration means. caller -- guest: it is a funny term. if you have looked it up on google 20 months ago, it would have something to do with coal and carbon, but this is about automatic cuts going into place known as sequestration. host: how did this come about? where is it headed? caller: as we recall from last year, there was a
and let me go into an environment and go kind of gambling around in that and suddenly find, you know what, i sort of like it and i'm watching it. i still think that is a huge park of the american television experience, and i think it gets sold short when you get techno ecstatic talking about anytime, anywhere. i do still think a lot of americans love the enjoyment of escapism and passivity and being able to just kind of rumor around the tv jungle of finding the things that they did not know were there. >> michael powell and the future of television to 98:00 eastern on "the communicators" on c-span2. >> a forum on the iranian nuclear program. part of an event recently hosted by the foundation for defense of democracy here in washington d.c. this is just over 40 minutes. >> great. thanks very much, david. thank you to all of you. thank you, senator casey. grateful for your remarks and service. we are going to do a topic that is going to sound technical, non-proliferation policy in the wake of the arab spring, but i want to put this to some human terms. this is the sum of all of your panel.
. and providing an environment that is conducive for business growth. and it has everything to do with the cost of labor, and it has everything to do with rell la , regulation, it has everything to do with the cost of utilities. and we need to be competitive there is 23 other states that are competitive with michigan on business growth. this will grow jobs and give opportunity for union members, non-union members, folks to relocate to michigan, grow our population once again, keep our young people here after they graduate college, so a whole host of issues here that are affected by a positive change like this for michigan. which is why there is so much support for this bill. >> sure, those sound like many a positive reason why this is a good thing, but at the same time, you have democrats and they're saying what you're doing here, with this law, is laying the ground work for endless confrontation. do you think that's true, endless confrontation? how do you see this playing out? these people say this is just the beginning. >> there is no place for confrontation here. some of the behavior going
's in your wallet? it's hard to see opportunity in today's challenging environment. unless you have the right perspective. bny mellon wealth management has the vision and experience to look beyond the obvious. we'll uncover opportunities, find hidden risk, and make success a reality. bny mellon wealth management >>> we are taking a look at the top cnn trends. he's the dude that lost his car in "dude where's my car" now ashton kutcher is playing the role of steve jobs. >> those are two very different characters. >> i would say so. it's one of the greatest and innovative american minds ever. >> the resemblance to a young steve jobs right out of the cradle of computers, it's pretty striking. michelle turner has that for us from hollywood. >> reporter: yes, just a few weeks the world will get its first look at the new movie about steve jobs. but we can share the first image from the film which stars ashton kutcher as the legendary man behind apple. this is the photo of kutcher in costume as jobs. he has the beeld and the long hair parted on the side. that was his look back in the day. critics are
it comes to young people from the most disadvantaged and troubled environments. there is so much to talk about. in an area we have been talking about on the skilled work force or how much there is a skill gap, i think this is a critical issue. i think that for us to have clear policies, we need to do a little better in clearly defining the challenge. first of all, i don't think there is any question that the main reason we are having higher unemployment right now is not structural. it is fundamentally cyclical, fundamentally the lack of demand that is still in our economy as we recover from the great recession. that said, that awareness, that recognition that ben bernanke and former cea lazear should not undermine that we face temporary or futures skills gaps but there is three reasons we should be focused on this. number one, even the unemployment today that is fundamentally about cyclical demand can easily become the next structural skills problem of the future. we know that one of the challenges we face right now in our economy is not just lowering unemployment, but lower and long-ter
and that's what you get in living in newark, new jersey, in an urban environment where the food is not particularly cheap is tough. you're right, they're not paying for every meal and calorie he's ingesting but that's not much food. >> what's part of that discussion a twitter conversation where somebody said the state shouldn't be responsible for nutrition, right? and because part of the problem here is that people who are food stamps don't have access to really healthy food. you see cory booker made his, you know, best attempt at getting healthy food, frozen vegetables, canned beans and things like that. that is part of the problem with nutrition and poverty stricken areas. >> and that amount. we have to take a short break. >> [ inaudible ]. >> still ahead -- >> have a job, son. >> you do. i'm going to check you. >> "the new york post" and its photographer taking heat over the cover photo of a man taking minutes before his death he was crushed by the train. did the paper cross the line in publishing that picture. we'll talk about that coming up. lashawn's got her christmas list
's challenging environment. unless you have the right perspective. bny mellon wealth management has the vision and experience to look beyond the obvious. we'll uncover opportunities, find hidden risk, and make success a reality. bny mellon wealth management ♪ [ laughter ] >> oh, sexy girlfriend! >> gretchen: who can forget that scene, a young gedde watanabe playing long duck dong almost 20 years ago in the classic flick "16 candles." >> steve: classic indeed. now he's back and stealing the spotlight from billy crystal and bet mitt letter in the fox film "parental guidance." >> these are parents. they're going to watch the kids. >> welcome to healthy tiger. >> what's that? n no msg, no gluten, no sodium. just healthy food! >> i'm drooling already. >> it's like me! >> my mother japanese. my father chinese. my kids go to hebrew day school, oy vay. >> eric: we're joined by gedde watanabe. it looks fantastic. tell us about the movie. >> well, it's a wonderful, wonderful family movie. it's about raising grandchildren, kids and the problems that go along with it. everyone will enjoy this movie. so
of gateway computer. he wants to turn michigan into the same low-wage environment we see in china. >> reporter: as you look at state troopers out here right now, some are equipped with batons. look at their hips. what they have on their hips there are gas masks. you can see some weapons they're carrying. nonlethal weapons that would be used to dispurse the tear gas if it was needed to. as we bring up we heard someone shouting in the background it has been a peaceful demonstration. it has. there was trouble on the first day. eight people were arrested. a little bit of tear gas went out. here in this demonstration, things have been peaceful. nothing more than a lot of people showing up in numbers expressing discontent with the legislature and the speed with this legislation and speed which it moved through the legislature, jenna, mike, we saw a sign behind you. it said there is war on workers in the state of michigan. what is the primary gripe of unions and their members? >> reporter: well the primary gripe you end up at end of the day with someone paying his union dues and creating
the environment at the agency. this is what the quote says. "the agency is a funny place. very insular. it's like middle schoolers with clearances." i want to get your take on that how does the cia culture play into this controversy surrounding this woman now? >> no question it's a very insular place by its very nature. they keep secrets. they have secret missions and secret goals. they achieve some. they are less successful with others. it's a very insular organization. i must tell you, when i read the quote, i not only cringed but i was offended. this notion of equating to middle school with clearances, look, these are people who work in the shadows. it's their choice to work in the shadows. but they do some very important work without which we wouldn't enjoy the military successes that we've enjoyed and diplomatic successes. their work is crucial. to equate this to a middle school squabble undermines the importance of the mission and dedication of the people out there. >> and when you look at this, you now have the movie. you have books. there are specials out. everyone very much interested in
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)